Lead paint

August 9, 2013

Mold, lead could delay Cheltenham school openings

Source: http://articles.philly.com, August 8, 2013
By: Jessica Parks

Lead-based paint lingers on the original foundation of Myers Elementary School in Cheltenham. Workers found it when they removed drywall for an unrelated construction project.

Lead-based paint lingers on the original foundation of Myers Elementary School in Cheltenham. Workers found it when they removed drywall for an unrelated construction project. (Cheltenham Township School District)

The Cheltenham Township School District is dealing with mold in the middle school and lead paint in an elementary school that could delay the start of the academic year.

Summer maintenance crews discovered “a significant presence of mold” at Cedarbrook Middle School in July, Superintendent Natalie Thomas wrote to staff.

They placed vacuum systems and dehumidifiers in several classrooms and hallways to eradicate it, but the mold kept reappearing due to “excessive damp weather and humidity,” according to district documents.

Around the same time, crews began repairing a water leak in the basement of Myers Elementary School. When workers tore back drywall, they found peeling paint on the original foundation. About a third of the paint tested positive for lead.…

May 22, 2013

Are Commercial Buildings and Public Buildings a Lead-Paint Hazard? Contractors Could be Impacted by Renovation Regulations Contemplated by EPA

Source: Environmental Law Solutions, May 13, 2013
By: Andrew Brought

If you manage or perform renovations, repairs, or painting activities on the exterior or interior of public building or commercial buildings, you should be aware that EPA is currently evaluating whether and how to regulate such activities in public buildings or commercial buildings constructed before 1978 that pose lead-based paint hazards. On Monday, May 13, 2013, EPA issued a notice in the Federal Register that it is seeking public comment on this topic until July 12, 2013, and will host a public meeting at EPA’s headquarters on June 26, 2013.

In April 2008, the EPA issued final regulations covering child-occupied target housing, which includes residential structures and most pre-1978 housing, as well as a subset of public and commercial buildings where young children spend a significant amount of time (known as the Lead Renovation, Repair, and Painting (RRP) Rule). The RRP Rule requires, among other things, that contractors and subcontractors be properly trained and certified and use safe work practices to minimize lead dust. The EPA has begun aggressively enforcing the RRP Rule. On May 2, 2013, EPA announced 17 enforcement actions for violations of the RRP Rule in Missouri, Nebraska, Michigan, Indiana, Florida, Tennessee, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York and New Hampshire. EPA initiated a similar sweeping enforcement action in November 2012 against 16 companies in a number of states including Kansas and Illinois.

March 14, 2013

MO Painting Company Fined

Read here about a painting company in St. Louis that has been fined for not taking precautions with lead-based paint.

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January 14, 2013

EPA ASSESSING NEED FOR LEAD PAINT CLEANUP RULE FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

Source: Inside EPA Weekly Report, January 11, 2013
Posted on: http://envfpn.advisen.com

EPA is seeking data to determine whether it should continue with plans to propose a rule governing renovations and repairs of public and commercial buildings with lead paint, a controversial measure Senate Republicans have questioned, but that EPA agreed to consider as part of a 2009 settlement with environmental groups.

According to an amended settlement agreement, EPA has until July 1, 2015, to either propose a rule covering renovation, repair and painting (RRP) in public and commercial buildings or determine those activities do not create lead-based paint hazards, according to a Dec. 31, 2012, Federal Register notice.

Meanwhile, EPA’s Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention (OCSPP) has resolved recommendations from the agency’s Office of Inspector General (IG) that included a request for OCSPP to reexamine the costs and benefits analysis it conducted in advance of the agency’s rule addressing lead-based paint hazards of RRP in housing.

In the wake of a hotline complaint concerning the residential RRP rule, the IG said EPA used “limited” data in its economic analysis, though the IG now says in a Dec. 21 memo that its recommendations have been resolved after OCSPP defended its analysis in an Oct. 22 memo to the IG. In the memo, the OCSPP says its analysis was appropriate, subject to public comment, and cleared by the White House Office of Management & Budget. Relevant documents are available on InsideEPA.com. (Doc ID: 2420558)

OCSPP also pledged to contact a broader range of the regulated community in its costs and benefits analysis for future lead-paint RRP rulemakings, including the rule for commercial buildings, according to a Nov. 28 memo.…

December 18, 2012

Contract fined for violating lead paint rules

Source: The Derry News (NH), December 13, 2012
Posted on: http://envfpn.advisen.com

Two years after the federal government adopted stricter lead-paint rules, a local contractor is one of only a few in New Hampshire to be fined for violating new regulations.

But Mark DiMinico, owner of Exterior Images in Derry, contends he’s being penalized unfairly. The painting contractor claims he had to pay more than $3,000 in fines for work done by another contractor years ago.

“I was pretty upset that they would find me guilty,” he said. “It’s just not the kind of business I run.”

DiMinico and his company have been cited by the Environmental Protection Agency for failing to make sure lead paint was properly removed from an apartment building at 7 Central St.

Exterior Images was cited for not notifying the occupants the work was taking place, including posting signs, according to the EPA. The firm also failed to cover the ground with plastic sheeting and to make sure potentially harmful lead particles weren’t released into the environment, the EPA said.

The EPA tightened its regulations because many homes being renovated have lead paint, which has been prohibited since 1978. Lead paint has been linked to developmental problems in young children.

The new regulations are punishable by a $37,500 for each day a firm fails to correct a violation, which some local contractors have said would easily put them out of business. Contractors also must wear protective clothing, use special equipment, and take a daylong training course to prove they know to prevent lead contamination.…

June 27, 2012

Take Control of Your Environmental Liability

Source: XL Group Insurance, Construction Insider
By: Laura Wagner, Vice President Construction Practice

Construction activities pose a variety of environmental risks. Construction equipment and materials brought to the jobsite, including fuels, solvents, adhesives, concrete, paint, pesticides, sealers, thinners, and waterproofing agents, all have the potential for environmental impact if mishandled or stored improperly. Water intrusion and the resulting potential for mold, leaks and spill during routine equipment maintenance and fuel storage also carry potential environmental liabilities.

In addition to the risks posed by equipment and materials, contractors also have to keep up with a variety of changing codes, rules and regulations. Clean Air and Clean Water Act violations with fines in the millions of dollars are making news. Asbestos litigation, legionella outbreaks, public perceptions on hydro-fracturing, lead rules and stormwater runoff are other hot topics that are on the list of contractors’ environmental concerns. Add to that the changing exposures surrounding green buildings and the state DOTs pollution coverage requirements and contractors have a lot to manage.

Given the nature of construction and its interaction with people and the environment, it is no wonder why environmental risk management is high up on a contractor’s list of business concerns. Contractors looking to protect public health, their employees and their profitability, have to be attentive to managing their environmental risks as well as the environmental risks around them that can become their problem if not properly handled.…

April 4, 2012

Sandblasting Contractor – Lead

Source: Rockhill Environmental/NECC Newsletter

A subcontractor working for a street and road contractor performed abrasive sandblasting on a bridge located near a residential area. Lead paint chips and dust from the sandblasting became airborne and migrated onto residential properties, requiring clean-up. The residents filed property damage claims against the street and road contractor and the subcontractor for the dust generated by the subcontractor.…

April 4, 2012

Painting Contractor – Lead

Source: Rockhill Environmental/NECC Newsletter

A child who lived in an apartment building constructed in the 1970s was diagnosed with lead poisoning. The renovation of the building by a painting contractor allegedly caused unsafe conditions for the child. The parents of the child filed a bodily injury claim against the painting contractor. As part of the investigation of the claim, an expert was hired. Other potential causes for the lead poisoning were discovered. As a result, the painting contractor was held liable for only a portion of the claim.…

January 24, 2012

The Realities of Real Estate: Ruling on lead paint law rocks the rental market

Source: http://www.hometownannapolis.com, January 22, 2012
By: Bob & Donna McWilliams

When anyone purchases or rents a place to live, above all, they want it to be safe. Our home is our refuge, and it’s important to be aware of anything that could challenge our security or sense of well-being.

Those challenges can come in many forms. The presence of high crime might be the first thing that comes to mind, but there are also less obvious concerns that can be equally threatening to the quiet enjoyment of our home. Nearby industry, power plants or military installations might cause excessive amounts of pollution or noise, and even within the house itself, there are issues to be mindful of in protecting your health and safety. Things like mold, asbestos and lead paint are but a few examples.

Recently, there have been changes in the laws governing how we address lead paint. These changes will have a dramatic and far-reaching effect on the housing market. But, before we get into that, let’s first review why lead paint is a concern and what has been done to date in an effort to protect real estate consumers.

Just as lead used to be in our gasoline because it made engines perform better, lead was also commonly found in paint because it improved coverage and durability. Millions of homes were covered with lead paint. In its day, it was considered a high-quality product.…

July 1, 2011

Painting Contractor – Lead

Acknowledgement to Great American Environmental Division

A child who lived in an apartment building constructed in the 1970s was diagnosed with lead poisoning. The renovation of the building by a painting contractor allegedly caused unsafe conditions for the child. The parents of the child filed a bodily injury claim against the painting contractor. As part of the investigation of the claim, an expert was hired. Other potential causes for the lead poisoning were discovered. As a result, the painting contractor was held liable for only a portion of the claim.…