Tampa City Council

March 21, 2013

Tampa metals recycler hopes for grant to help fund site cleanup

Source: Tampa Tribune, March 17, 2013
Posted on: http://envfpn.advisen.com

An East Tampa scrap yard is in line to become the city’s latest industrial site targeted for environmental cleanup.

Trademark Metals Recycling LLC has asked the city and state to designate property it owns in an industrial zone east of Ybor City as a brownfield. The designation opens up federal and state coffers for cleanup and redevelopment of contaminated land.

Trademark attorney Michael R. Goldstein said his clients plan to clean up the former Gulf Coast Metals site using the help of state brownfield tax credits. The property will continue to operate as an aluminum furnace, melting cast-off cans and other materials for resale.

The brownfield program will help clean up the property and expand operations, adding both jobs and taxes to the local economy, Goldstein said.

“We’re going to spend not an insignificant amount of money improving the site,” Goldstein said.

The Tampa City Council has set two public hearings on the brownfield request, at 6 p.m. April 11 and 10:30 a.m. May 2. Both hearings will be in Old City Hall’s council chambers downtown.

Tampa has 25 brownfield sites already. The list includes many, such as the Ikea site off State Road 60, that have been redeveloped. Outside the city, Hillsborough County has 14 more brownfields, according to the state Department of Environmental Protection.…

September 20, 2011

Deal to settle Tampa Bay Water reservoir lawsuit comes up one vote short

Source: http://www.tampabay.com, September 20, 2011
By: Craig Pittman

A sharply divided Tampa Bay Water board voted Monday to settle its lawsuit against the company that designed its flawed reservoir, with HDR Engineering handing over $30 million — far less than the cost of a repair, which means the ratepayers would likely pick up the rest of the tab.

The regional utility’s management announced the settlement in a news release, and an HDR executive hailed it as the best possible solution.

But there was a problem. The settlement passed by a vote of 4-3 — and it turns out that’s not enough.

Late Monday, two Pinellas County commissioners who were on the losing side of the vote pointed out what was wrong: The rules governing Tampa Bay Water require at least five of the board’s nine members to ratify any legal settlement.

Votes to approve the settlement fell one short, so “it doesn’t count,” said Pinellas Commissioner Susan Latvala.

Latvala and Commissioner Neil Brickfield had voted against the settlement and then heard about the problem from county attorneys who were familiar with how Tampa Bay Water was set up, she said.…